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First Nations People with disability

  • Issues papers
Publication date

Our issues paper on the experiences of First Nations people with disability is asking the public to share their views about what they think governments, institutions and communities can do to prevent violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation of First Nations peoples with disability. We are interested in examples of laws, policies and practices in different settings that are not working or working well. This can be in areas such as education, healthcare, workplaces, the justice system, home, online communities, and families.

The issues paper asks 12 questions to help people and organisations to provide responses. The paper is available in Easy Read, PDF and DOCX.

How to respond

The Royal Commission has extended the deadline for this issues paper. We encourage responses from individuals and organisations by 16 October 2020. After this date, any comments about this issues paper can be made via the submissions process.

Responses to the issues paper can be provided, either:

  • electronically to DRCEnquiries@royalcommission.gov.au
  • in writing to GPO Box 1422, Brisbane, Queensland 4001
  • by phone on 1800 517 199 or +61 7 3734 1900, we can make a time with you to take your response over the phone (Monday to Friday, excluding national public holidays)
  • by audio recording
  • by video recording.

Responses can be in any language. The Royal Commission will translate the response to English.

We may make your response public unless you tell us not to.

Issues paper (Auslan) - First Nations People with disability
 

First Nations people with disability issues paper

This is about the Royal Commission into Violence Abuse Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability.

They have produced an issues paper on an important topic.

They are interested in the experiences of First Nations people with disability.

They would like your feedback on this topic.

Your response will help them in their work.

Background

First Nations people with disability face particular challenges in their day-to-day lives.

This includes accessing education, healthcare and work.

It also includes having contact with the criminal justice system and child welfare system.

Research shows that First Nations people with disability are at greater risk of harm than the rest of the population.

For example First Nations people with disability are more likely to experience ongoing, repeated physical violence.

They are more likely to be removed from their family, or have relatives removed from their family.

First Nations people are often in gaol with undiagnosed cognitive disability.

Often the harm they experience is associated with stigma or a lack of cultural understanding and is a form of discrimination.

What we want to know

The Disability Royal Commission wants to know what governments, institutions and communities can do to prevent violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation of First Nations people with disability.

The Disability Royal Commission wants to know about laws, policies and practices that are not working, or working well.

This applies to the community, on-line, education, healthcare, workplaces or the justice system.

The Disability Royal Commission is interested in ways to expand initiatives that are led by First Nations Peoples that protect the rights of First Nations people with disability.

How to respond

At the end of the issues paper is a list of questions.

You do not have to answer every question. You can respond in any way you like.

You can respond in writing or by a video recording. Then send it to the Disability Royal Commission.

To read the full issues paper, and for more details on how to respond, go to the Policy & Research section on their website.